Home

French and English Bulldog: what is the difference?

French and English Bulldog: what is the difference?

French and English Bulldog: what is the difference?

The French Bulldog and the English Bulldog can be easily distinguished already by their appearance. The difference is especially visible in the ears. Whether the lovable dogs also differ in attitude and care?

While the French Bulldog has erect ears, the English Bulldog has cropped ears. In addition, the British cousin of the bat-eared dogs is larger than its French counterpart.

This is how English and French Bulldogs differ visually

The English Bulldog also stands out in contrast to its French cousin due to its large head, which makes it appear more massive and stocky overall than the more petite French Bulldog. The underbite is also more pronounced in English Bulldogs than in their French cousins.

Skin folds are a characteristic feature of both Bulldog varieties, but they are even slightly deeper in the English Bulldog than in the French Bulldog.

Difference in attitude and care?

The French Bulldog likes to please its master and mistress and is therefore relatively easy to train. The English Bulldog, in contrast, needs somewhat more experienced dog owners, as they are relatively stubborn. You should be even more consistent with the English Bulldog than with the little bat ears, but remain fair. Bulldogs are quite sensitive and do not like too sharp a tone.

Both the English Bulldog and the French Bulldog are prone to shortness of breath and their wrinkles should be cleaned and groomed regularly. The French dogs freeze easily in cold weather and may need a winter coat. Their English relatives, on the other hand, tend to suffer more in the summer. They should not have to move too much then and should get enough water and have a shady place to rest.

Life expectancy of the two bulldog breeds

On average, the French Bulldog has a slightly longer life expectancy than the English Bulldog. While the English variety will live an average of eight to ten years, you can expect the French dogs to live ten to twelve years. However, how old your dog will ultimately live depends on a number of factors, not just the breed. With species-appropriate employment, a healthy diet, regular check-ups at the vet (especially as they get older), and loving, consistent training, dogs can definitely live to be older than average. Overweight, too little exercise or overwork, on the other hand, can shorten their life expectancy.

HZOES.COM

HZOES.COM

Cute and funny, info and tips about dogs, cats and other animals. Great pictures and funny videos from the animal world. Your animals on hzoes.com

More articles from dog

Find a suitable food bowl for the dog.
Dog Keeping

Find a suitable food bowl for the dog.

Find a suitable food bowl for the dog. From the classic ceramic food bowl to variants made of stainless steel to the food bar – …

Read More →
Doberman: character and features of the dog
Dog Buying

Doberman: character and features of the dog

Doberman: character and features of the dog The Doberman is a large, strong dog that has a loyal, lovable character – but it is also …

Read More →
Barfing dog: Advantages and disadvantages of feeding fresh meat
Dog Food

Barfing dog: Advantages and disadvantages of feeding fresh meat

Barfing dog: Advantages and disadvantages of feeding fresh meat If raw meat, offal, vegetables and oils end up in the dog’s bowl, we are talking …

Read More →
Nose work with the dog: exercises for home
Dog Training

Nose work with the dog: exercises for home

Nose work with the dog: exercises for home Nose work is one of the favorite activities of every dog. As a dog owner, you always …

Read More →
Why is my dog shaking? Is he sick?
Dog Health

Why is my dog shaking? Is he sick?

Why is my dog shaking? Is he sick? If your dog trembles, it does not necessarily mean that he is sick. Shaking can have many …

Read More →
Vestibular syndrome in dogs: causes, symptoms, and treatment
Dog Health

Vestibular syndrome in dogs: causes, symptoms, and treatment

Vestibular syndrome in dogs: causes, symptoms, and treatment The vestibular syndrome is a disorder of the equilibrium organ in dogs. Mostly older quadrupeds are affected …

Read More →
This site uses cookies

By continuing to use our site, you agree to our T & Cs and the use of our Cookies & amp;trackers as well as those of our partners in order to offer you content, services, personalized advertising and to generate statistics & amp; audience analysis.